TiVo's Android app now lets you stream recorded TV shows

Derek Walter , Greenbot Follow me on Google+

Derek Walter is a freelance technology writer based in Northern California. He is the author of Learning MIT App Inventor, a hands-on guide to building your own Android apps.
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You won't have to wonder what happened in the latest Game of Thrones episode next time you're lounging by the poolside on vacation. Just whip out your phone and watch the battles for glory—at least if you're a TiVo subscriber.

TiVo's Android app now streams programming saved on your DVR. It also has added capabilities to serve as a hub for all your TiVo services, including controlling the TiVo box as well as showing cast information and other details about the show you're watching.

tivo Google Play

Watch live or recorded programs on the TiVo Android app.

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Comcast brings stream-anywhere cloud DVR to major cities

Jared Newman , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Jared writes for PCWorld and TechHive from his remote outpost in Cincinnati.
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Comcast is rolling out its cloud DVR service across the country, beginning the long slog toward a future without set-top boxes.

The new service will let customers stream DVR'd TV recordings to PCs, Macs, iOS devices, and Android devices, even outside the home. It's similar in function to Dish's Hopper DVR, but because the recordings are stored in the cloud, it could eventually allow for new features such as unlimited tuners and unlimited storage, GigaOM reports.

What this means: This is just the first step toward eliminating the DVR box altogether. At first, cloud DVR will simply allow Comcast to install set-top boxes without hard drives, but it's not hard to imagine an all-streaming service supplemented by cloud recordings, delivered straight to connected TVs, phones, tablets and laptops. As GigaOM points out, Comcast already offers a streaming service—albeit without DVR—at select universities.

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Move over Chromecast: $25 Firefox-powered Matchstick streaming adapter revealed

Ian Paul ian@ianpaul.net, TechHive Follow me on Google+

Ian is an independent writer based in Tel Aviv, Israel. His current focus is on all things tech including mobile devices, desktop and laptop computers, software, social networks, Web apps, tech-related legislation and corporate tech news.
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Remember back in June when we told you about a Firefox OS-powered HDTV dongle that was in the works? Well, the device is almost here and it's called Matchstick, according to a blog post on Mozilla's site.

The new dongle is not the work of Mozilla, but the project does have the blessing of the open source organization, and it's not hard to see why. The company behind the dongle, also called Matchstick, is promising a 100 percent open platform for hardware and software, with no gatekeepers or review period for Matchstick apps.

If a developer can write it, Matchstick will run it, the developers say.

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Five things Apple should fix in the next Apple TV update

Susie Ochs Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Susie is a proud Mac geek, as well as a writer, editor, snowboarder, and mom.
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Apple TV got a software update last week that didn’t exactly blow our hair back—the icons got a new, flat, iOS 7-and-8-ish look, and we got Family Sharing support, a new Beats Music channel, and that’s about it. The new icons are pretty and all, but the experience of actually using the Apple TV didn’t noticeably improve. Here are five suggestions for Apple to make the next Apple TV update a real upgrade.

One login

The most frustrating thing about the Apple TV is how each channel that requires a pay TV provider description makes you log in separately—and they don’t all support the same roster of providers. If you have Time Warner Cable, there’s no way of knowing which channels that works with without having to check each channel individually, hunting around for the login screen, since they don’t all have it in the same place. It’s maddening.

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Netflix's 'Crouching Tiger' sequel will start streaming the same day it hits theaters

Jared Newman , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Jared writes for PCWorld and TechHive from his remote outpost in Cincinnati.
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Netflix is taking on movie theaters with its first major feature film, a follow-up to 2000's "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"—and it'll start streaming to Netflix subscribers the same day it lands in cinemas.

According to Deadline, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: The Green Legend" will premiere simultaneously on Netflix and in IMAX theaters on August 28, 2015. It'll likely be the first Netflix film to launch day-and-date in theaters, though the streaming service has other film deals in the works.

What it means: Netflix has long bemoaned Hollywood's “windowing” system, which dictates when movies can go from theaters to home video to streaming. These windows are one reason why Netflix doesn't have lots of new releases to choose from, so now, Netflix is trying to create its own hits, just as it did for TV shows with House of Cards and Orange is the New Black. The simultaneous IMAX release will test the idea that some people will pay for the theater experience even if they can watch for much cheaper at home.

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The Binge-Watch List: Transparent is set to be Amazon's biggest original show

Monty Ashley Writer, TechHive Follow me on Google+

Monty Ashley lives in Seattle, where he watches movies and television, reads books, and plays games. He's trying to learn Latin, for reasons known only to him. He has written for Wizards of the Coast, Television Without Pity, and Previously.TV, and podcasts with The Incomparable.
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It’s not hard to find TV shows to watch these days. But finding good ones to watch amid all the streaming video services fighting for your attention and your eyeballs? That’s more of a challenge. Every other week, we’ll help you separate a would-be House of Cards from the rest of the pack, as we look at which streaming TV shows are worth your time.

Amazon is serious about making television shows—which is to say that they’re actually doing it, rather than just sending out press releases. On Friday, the entire first season of Transparent became available for streaming, fulfilling the implicit promise made by the pilot. That pilot first appeared in March as part of a bigger slate of potential pilots, and now it’s finally becoming a real live child.

In this metaphor, becoming a real live child means that enough episodes have been created to make it an actual series—yes, it’s a Pinocchio reference. And although it might have been clearer had the phrase been “real live boy,” for reasons that will soon become evident, the phrase seemed more apt when it was rendered gender-neutral.

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Netflix stands up to regulatory pressure from Canada, France, and the Netherlands

James Careless , TechHive

James Careless has been covering the Internet since the days of 1200 baud modems. His credits include Business Week, KM World, Network World, PCWorld, and Streaming Media.
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Standing tough! Despite having the screws put to it, Netflix is refusing to buckle to pressure from French, Dutch and Canadian regulators.

The streaming media service has refused to sign any VOD tax agreements with the French and Dutch governments. Netflix has also rebelled against the French government’s demand not to screen movies that have been in theatrical distribution for three years or less, in compliance with France’s Cultural Exception rules.

As for the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) ordering Netflix to submit its Canadian subscriber numbers, as part of this regulator’s hearing into the Canadian TV industry? “Yeah, right,” sums up the streaming service’s more polite response to this demand. (Factoid: Netflix’s 50 million-plus global subscriber base exceeds Canada’s total population of 35 million.)

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