Cat sings Daft Punk's 'Get Lucky' (and five other nerdy song covers)

Chris Brandrick Contributor, TechHive

Chris Brandrick is a freelance writer with an interest in all things tech, gadgets, and gaming.
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Forget robots—this Daft Punk cover from YouTube user Enjoykin is all about the cats.

"Cat Lucky" replaces Phattell Williams's silky vocals with that of a musical moggie. Now, we're not entirely sure if this rendition is a cat-chy as the original, but you'll find yourself meow-ing along nonetheless:

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Help decide the final ship in this proposed Lego FTL set

Jacob Siegal Contributor, TechHive

Jacob Siegal spends a vast majority of his time surrounded with and invested in technology and media, so he decided he may as well start writing about it. You can find more of his writing at Game Rant and his topical tweets @JacobSiegal.


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Ever since Lego started producing fanmade project through its Cuusoo program, we’ve been reporting on both the big successes and the ideas that still need support.

Up until now, though, we haven't had any direct say over the final product, but the designers behind the ships from FTL (Faster Than Light), an indie game that came out last September, are just a couple hundred votes away from reaching the next stage, and they want their supporters to help decide which ship will fill in the third spot for the set if Lego decides to produce the project.

Personally, I’m all for the Gila Monster, but the Torus is no slouch either. At the time of writing, the Torus is only winning by a single vote, so go pick your favorite before the poll ends!

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Veebot the robot will suck your blood—for science!

Kevin Lee Contributor, TechHive

Kevin is a small-time tech hound, amateur photographer, and a general know-at-least-something of all things geeky hailing from New York.
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Getting your blood drawn sucks—especially if the lab technician is new at the job. So instead of getting poked up to six times (this has happened to me), one startup is developing a prototype medical robot called Veebot that’s designed to stick you with needles and suck your blood.

Welp…

Before Veebot gets its robot vampirism down, it squeezes your arm a little bit restrict your blood flow and make your veins pop up. From there, it shines an infrared light to scan for your veins. Veebot also uses an ultrasound scan to be doubly sure that it’s about to poke a blood vessel, and not just randomly jab you in the arm.

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Forget metadata, this tiny tooth-fitted sensor will record all your mouthdata

Evan Dashevsky Staff Writer, TechHive Follow me on Google+

Evan lives in Brooklyn, NY and enjoys writing about what future may hold and taking long romantic walks on the beach.
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Feel uneasy about the NSA rifling through your communication records? Well, Mr. Privacy, that might be small potatoes if certain research bears out. In the future, small computers embedded in your teeth might create a digital trail of everything your jaw does, from eating to drinking to speaking.

Researchers at the National Taiwan University in Taipei have created a circuit board small enough to implant into dentures. Utilizing an accelerometer, the tiny teeth tech processes jaw movements into data streams, which can then be translated by algorithms into specific actions such as drinking, eating, talking, coughing, or drinking.

In a test of eight patients fitted with the prototype, the technology accurately recorded “oral activities” 94% of the time.

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Making a stop-motion version of Donkey Kong is not for the faint of heart

Chris Brandrick Contributor, TechHive

Chris Brandrick is a freelance writer with an interest in all things tech, gadgets, and gaming.
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Stop-motion Donkey KongGuizDP - YouTube

Here’s Donkey Kong as you’ve never seen him before—recreated entirely with perler beads.

YouTube user Guiz de Pessemier is the man behind the faithful recreation: His stop-motion video of the 1981 classic game is a near-perfect reconstruction, complete with three levels of "Jumpman" action. Creating the video required hundreds of perler beads, plenty of photos, lots of patience, and one crisp black bed sheet.

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Gut plushies turn organs into lovable stuffed toys, but aren't for the sqeamish

Elizabeth Fish Contributor, TechHive

Elizabeth Fish is a freelance writer who happens to run a hyperlocal news website in Lincoln, UK. She also covers all things geeky for TechHive.
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I Heart Guts

Forget treating a loved one to an adorable virus or two—get them a spleen, or mammary gland to cuddle instead! Erm, what?

Plushie company I Heart Guts produces a variety of body parts as cuddly toys, in the hope of providing a tongue-in-cheek way of cheering up someone with an issue from a broken heart to toothache. Body parts can be pretty ugly or weird-looking, so I Heart Guts makes sure to add color and smiley faces to each. D'aww.

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Nvidia prototypes its own VR headset, makes personal gaming slightly less nerdy

Kevin Lee Contributor, TechHive

Kevin is a small-time tech hound, amateur photographer, and a general know-at-least-something of all things geeky hailing from New York.
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The Oculus Rift has been sitting pretty in the head-mounted display space by itself for a while now, But if this research project from Nvidia is any indication, it'll might have some company in the not-too-distant future.

At first glance, Nvidia’s prototype head-mounted display looks more like a pair of sunglasses than a VR headset. Part of the plan is to create a new headset that’s much lighter in weight so you can wear it for longer periods of time without discomfort. At the same time, Nvidia's research team has developed a microlens array that helps enlarge individual pixels and even produces stereoscopic 3D.

Nvidia developed its very early prototype by actually hacking apart a head-mounted display (HMD)  for Sony's ECX332A OLED microdisplays—which serve as the digital viewfinders in Sony Alpha cameras. Nvidia engineers also placed a microlens display that resolves the entire pixel display into one sharp, high-quality image.

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