This coffee machine prepares your morning buzz when it sees you yawn

Elizabeth Fish Contributor, TechHive

Elizabeth Fish is a freelance writer who happens to run a hyperlocal news website in Lincoln, UK. She also covers all things geeky for TechHive.
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Coffee drinkers, prepare for what might be the biggest innovation ever—a coffee machine that serves up fresh brew when it sees you yawn.

This Douwe Egberts coffee vending machine, located at O.R Tambo International Airport in Kempton Park, South Africa, comes equipped with a camera and facial recognition software that detects when a passer-by yawns. This prompts the machine—which is part of the brand's "Bye Bye Red Eye" ad campaign—to make a cup of coffee for the weary traveller, stat.  While there are plenty of concerns surrounding facial recognition, I think this is one use of the nascent technology that we can all get behind.

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Relive Curiosity's greatest accomplishments from its first year on Mars

Jacob Siegal Contributor, TechHive

Jacob Siegal spends a vast majority of his time surrounded with and invested in technology and media, so he decided he may as well start writing about it. You can find more of his writing at Game Rant and his topical tweets @JacobSiegal.


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August 6, 2012 was a terrifyingly exciting day for the men and women of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. After years of planning and several months of space travel, Curiosity had finally reached Mars, and just seven minutes would decide if the robot would land safely on the surface. We all held our breath...and just like that the rover had touched down, safe and sound.

Curiosity has been a very busy rover since it landed on the Red Planet a year ago, so we figured that we would help commemorate this momentous occasion by recounting some of the rover's most noteworthy achievements.

Curiosity’s first steps

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Watch as the MESSENGER probe looks back to Earth, bids our fair planet adieu

Rachel Martin Contributor, TechHive

Rachel is a recent MIT graduate with a bachelor's in materials science and engineering. She likes 3D printing, solar cells, and maybe 3D printing solar cells, as well as videos of cats being confused by Roombas.
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NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft, which is on an eight-years-and-counting mission to map and analyze the surface of Mercury, took the opportunity to look over its shoulder as it left Earth’s orbit for the first—and last—time.

MESSENGER has orbited Mercury over 2000 times since March 18, 2011, and is scheduled to crash-land on the surface of the solar system’s innermost planet when it completes its survey. Periodically, it’ll check out our home planet and send us a picture from an astronomical unit (plus or minus a bit) away.

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Scientists turn coffee into booze, stop short of recreating Four Loko

Kevin Lee Contributor, TechHive

Kevin is a small-time tech hound, amateur photographer, and a general know-at-least-something of all things geeky hailing from New York.
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Researchers from the University of Minho in Portugal have been messing around with two of our favorite vices: coffee and alcohol. Now they have found a way to combine the two into an 80-proof liquor that still has the nutty aroma of coffee. Unlike a mixed coffee drink like Irish coffee, this dual-shot beverage is actually fermented from the coffee beans themselves.

And yes, in case you were wondering, you can try it at home. According to Science Magazine, you’ll first need to heat coffee grounds in water at 325 degrees Fahrenheit to collect the resulting liquid. From there, you add sugar as well as yeast to begin the fermenting process, which you allow to run its course until the brew reaches around 40 percent alcohol content.

The one downside of this product is it destroys the caffeine in the coffee, so you won’t be able to get buzzed and caffeinated at the same time. (If you could, the FDA would probably want to have a word with you.)

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After a year on Mars, NASA's Curiosity rover changes our view of the solar system

Sharon Gaudin , Computerworld Follow me on Google+

Sharon Gaudin covers the Internet and Web 2.0, emerging technologies, and desktop and laptop chips for Computerworld.
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After just a year working on Mars, the NASA rover Curiosity is changing the way we look at our solar system.

Scientists say it may change how we look at ourselves, too.

“This work changes the picture of the solar system that we’ve had,” Jennifer Trosper, NASA’s deputy project manager for the Mars Science Lab Mission, told Computerworld. “In terms of the picture of the solar system that we all grew up learning, what if you draw a picture of it millions or billions of years ago and Mars was blue and looked more like Earth?

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Gizmo uses augmented reality to bring greeting cards into the 21st century

Elizabeth Fish Contributor, TechHive

Elizabeth Fish is a freelance writer who happens to run a hyperlocal news website in Lincoln, UK. She also covers all things geeky for TechHive.
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Even in this digital age, there's something intimate about receiving an old-fashioned paper greeting card or a handwritten letter. As you might expect, greeting card companies are looking to bridge the gap between analog and digital with the likes of e-cards, and some are even experimenting with augmented reality (AR) cards. San Francisco-based designer John Littleboy wants to combine the best of both the digital and physical worlds.

Meet Gizmo: It's a selection of paper cards that come to life when you point a smartphone or tablet running a specialized app at them. Your recipient will get a nice handwritten card, but with the added bonus of an AR character—maybe a robot or a mermaid or even a bulldog—that will appear onscreen and make your greeting a little more interactive. 

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Robots attach together to fly as one, show that teamwork isn't just for humans

Nick Mediati , TechHive Follow me on Google+

Nick is a freelance contributor and a former editor for TechHive and PCWorld. He likes puns and the color yellow.
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Here's the latest anxiety-inducing development for those who fear the coming robot insurrection: Researchers at ETH in Zurich developed a fleet of flying robots that can attach to one another and fly in almost any formation imaginable. The individual robots fly using a single propeller, and according to ETH researchers, one of these robots by itself "is erratic and uncontrolled" in the air. But combine the robots and attach them to one another, and they work in concert in order to achieve more stable flight.

The robots actually exchange information when attached to one another, which allows them to work together and determine how to control the thrust to keep the robot in the air without buzzing around like a drunken mosquito.

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