save primary facebook

Facebook's new Save feature lets you read clickbait (and other stuff) later

Watch out, Pocket. Move over, Readability. Facebook's getting into the read-it-later action with a new Save feature designed to—you guessed it—save content you find on the social network for later reading.

introducingsave3 facebook

Facebook will also surface saved content in your News Feed periodically. (Click to enlarge.)

The feature lets you stash links and Facebook Pages for movies, music, places, et cetera, and then revisit said content later from any device via a Saved listing found under the More section in-app or the list of options on the left side of Facebook's web interface. Facebook automatically sorts your Saves based on content type and will even remind you of what's still awaiting your eyeballs from time to time in your News Feed.

The Save button will appear as a discrete button in lower-right corner of applicable posts, as well as in the drop-down options menu in the upper-right corner.

It's a simple addition, but a welcome one, even if Facebook’s primary motivation for adding it is to get you to spend more time within the confines of its social network. If your News Feed is anything like mine, it's a torrid flood of links, with interesting stuff like this video washing away in mere minutes. The new Save feature combats the flood and will no doubt counter the pesky way Facebook's News Rank algorithms often refuse to show you the same material twice.

That being said, if you'd think you'd use this feature to save links more than anything else, it seems to lack some of the allure of those aforementioned read-it-later apps like Pocket and Readability. For starters, Save is obviously limited to content found on Facebook alone, and since your Save list is woven into the service itself, it'll likely lack the offline reading options found in competitors, which could be a problem for folks who like to plow through their article backlog during a bus or train commute. Both Readability and Pocket also strip away the clutter of ads and toolbars found across the web and present articles in an extremely easy-on-the-eyes format—something you'll never, ever, ever find in an official Facebook offering.

Look for the new Save feature to start popping up in-app and on Facebook's web interface "over the next few days."

Subscribe to the Best of TechHive Newsletter

Comments