Santech Gets the Sandy Bridge Party Started

CES 2011 is only a few days away, but that hasn't stopped Santech from getting the Sandy Bridge party started: This Italian company has announced its upcoming laptop (Google translation) ahead of the show, with several new Intel processor options included.

The new 15.6-inch black laptop, dubbed the N67, features speedy USB 3.0 ports and an HDMI port, can support up-to 16GB of DDR3 RAM, and will be made available with an SSD storage option. However, what's more important is the N67's inclusion of Intel's looming new line of CPUs, code-named Sandy Bridge.

The N67 will be made available with either a 2.2GHz Intel Core i7-2720QM, a 2.3GHz Intel Core i7-2820QM or a 2.5GHz Intel Core i7-2920XM. The Santech laptop looks like it will be one of the first devices to house the new CPU--something we'll probably see a lot of at CES.

Of course, the only issue with the Sandy Bridge processor line, like many other tech products, is the terrible product naming. Sure, we have had a while to get our heads around the Sandy Bridge naming system, but seeing it used for real only highlights how mind-boggling it all is.

The Sandy Bridge CPUs will carry on the Intel Core i3/i5/i7 generation name--the CPU names are made up of the brand name, modifier, generation number, SKU number, and a letter suffix. So, for the Intel Core i7-272QM, you have: Intel Core (brand name) i7 (modifier) -2 (generation) 720 (SKU) QM (letter suffix). Got it? Good; you're going to be seing these numbers, among others, quoted a lot over these coming weeks.

Confusing processor names aside, the highly customizable Santech N67 will be shipping from the end of January with prices starting at just over €1,000 (or about $1325 at current exchange rates).

[via Gizmocrave]

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