PlayStation 4 (2)

PlayStation 4 gets Netflix and more at launch, but where's the music?

PlayStation 4 buyers will have plenty of streaming video options when the console launches next week, but will likely have to get their tunes from elsewhere.

In a blog post, Sony announced 11 entertainment apps that will be available at launch:

  • Amazon Instant Video
  • Crackle
  • Crunchyroll
  • EPIX
  • Hulu Plus
  • NBA Game Time
  • Netflix
  • NHL GameCenter Live
  • Redbox Instant by Verizon
  • Vudu
  • YuppTV

Users should be well-covered for movies and television, between subscription services such as Netflix and on-demand sources such as Vudu and Amazon. Still, Sony's game console is missing a few major video apps, including WatchESPN, HBO Go and YouTube.

The bigger omission is music, with not a single third-party music app on the list. The only option for music on the PS4 is Sony's own subscription-based Music Unlimited service. It's possible that users could stream some other music sources through the PS4's Web browser, but we won't know how well that works until the console launches.

To make matters worse, the PS4 won't play MP3s or audio CDs, and doesn't support DLNA for playing music from a networked computer. (This could change in the future, with a Sony FAQ saying “We appreciate your feedback and are exploring possibilities.”)

Microsoft hasn't announced a full streaming app lineup for the Xbox One yet. The Xbox 360's music choices include iHeartRadio, Last.FM, Rhapsody, Slacker and Vevo, but there's no word on whether these apps will make the leap to Microsoft's next console. Still, Microsoft has already promised support for audio CDs, MP3s and DLNA streaming.

Sony's PS4 is launching on November 15, for $400. The Xbox One is coming out one week later for $500.

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