T-Mobile sues AT&T over use of magenta, CEO tweets barbs about crayons

Walk into any T-Mobile store and you are instantly inundated with its trademark fuchsia. We've recently learned two things about that fuchsia: 1) T-Mobile considers the hue to be a “magenta,” and 2) they take protecting it very seriously. Last Friday, the company filed a law suit against rival carrier AT&T alleging that the company’s new off-contract subsidiary Aio Wireless commandeered T-Mobiles trademark magenta in an effort to confuse consumers.

According to the complaint, “AT&T Inc set up Aio to compete directly with T-Mobile,” and Aio’s use of the color magenta “is likely to dilute T-Mobile USA, Inc. (TMUS)’s famous magenta color trademark, and to create initial interest confusion.”

T-Mobile’s combative CEO, John Legere who has never been shy about attacking AT&T has taken to Twitter to mock his company’s rival.

Aio then took to the microblogging service to say that T-Mobile “needs an art lesson. We don’t do magenta,” followed by the hashtag #Plum.

See if you can tell the difference in the puple-y hues with these two screenshots from the respective companies' websites:

T-Mobile Aio
Does Aio's website (bottom) utilize magenta or plum?
T-Mobile (top) claims the color is the same as its signature magenta.

Aio launched earlier this year to offers pre-paid, off-contract wireless service on AT&T’s networks. The company offers similar options to T-Mobile's unsubsidized Simple Choice plans, which have helped T-Mobile make a noticeable dent in the mobile market. Aio is currently only available in a few cities throughout the south, but promises to expand nationwide in the coming year.

For comprehensive coverage of the Android ecosystem, visit Greenbot.com.

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