Deus Ex: The Fall jams jailbreakers, already fixed by hackers

Users of jailbroken iPhones and iPads who purchase Deus Ex: The Fall will find the game to be a lot harder than they expected.

That’s because Eidos has disabled the ability to fire weapons in the game on jailbroken iOS devices. “We are sorry but you can’t fire on jailbroken devices,” a message reads whenever the player tries to shoot a gun.

A user on Reddit first brought the issue to wider attention. And while some commenters suggested a non-lethal playthrough of the game—using stealth instead of force—might still be possible, even that option is made more difficult by the inability to fire a tranquilizer gun.

Presumably, Eidos is jamming weapons on jailbroken devices as an anti-piracy measure. With a jailbroken iPhone or iPad, it’s possible to venture outside the App Store and download pirated apps for free.

In that sense, the move is reminiscent of other in-game efforts to discourage piracy, such as the infamous pink scorpion in Serious Sam 3 and the busted hang glider in Batman: Arkham Asylum.

But there’s one big difference in the case of Deus Ex: By restricting play on all jailbroken devices, Eidos is punishing its paying customers as well. Although Eidos has added a disclaimer to the app description page, that might not be enough to stop people from wasting their money.

Fortunately for these users, a fix already exists. On jailbroken devices, users can download and install XCON through the Cydia app store. Forumgoers at iMore claim that this well help not only with Deus Ex, but with other apps that are restricted on jailbroken iPhones and iPads.

It makes you wonder why Eidos even bothered. Paying customers may be scared away by the restrictions, and those who have pirated the app have an easy workaround anyway. People who actually paid for the game now have to jump through extra hoops, and it’s possible that the game’s App Store ratings may suffer as a result.

For the vast majority of iOS users, the walled garden of the App Store is effective enough as a form of digital rights management. Eidos just got a little too greedy in trying to stop every last pirate—an effort that has already proven futile.

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