Snapjoy photo service shuts down

Snapjoy, the photo aggregator acquired a scant six months ago by Dropbox, is shutting down. A highly regarded service that let users import their images from a number of popular online photo-sharing services such as Flickr, Picasa, Facebook, and Twitter and then view all the photos on one site, Snapjoy announced its demise smack in the middle of a sleepy summer weekend.

In a terse email to subscribers, which gave no hint of the reasons behind the move, Snapjoy said, “After two years of building Snapjoy, the time has come for us to shut down the service.”

That’s quite a different message than just six months ago, when Snapjoy founders Michael Dwan and JP Ren trumpeted the deal with Dropbox.

“We’ve always admired Dropbox and loved their product,” the Snapjoy founders stated in their blog post announcing the purchase. “From the moment we met the [Dropbox] founders, it was clear we shared a common goal. By combining forces with their amazing team, we can leverage the technology and scale of their platform and focus on what matters—delivering an incredible photo experience to over 100 million people.”

As of June 22, no more photos could be imported into Snapjoy, and the Snapjoy iPhone app is no longer available. Snapjoy instructs subscribers to visit the site, log in, and then download the zip files containing their photos. Subscriber photos will be accessible to download from the website until July 24. Thereafter, all photos and data will be permanently deleted, the company said.

Whatever corporate devolution took place after the Snapjoy acquisition was a private matter. After December 19, the company’s blogs halted until yesterday, when it posted its farewell to subscribers in text identical to its email.

Snapjoy, based in Boulder, Colorado, was founded in May 2011 with financing from Y Combinator. It operated independently for a year and a half until it was acquired by Dropbox just before Christmas 2012.

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