LinkedIn buys Pulse newsreader, no changes planned yet

It’s been a strange few weeks for news-reading apps. First, Google announced plans to shutter Reader, its popular RSS service. Long-time Reader users fled to competitor Feedly in droves, and Digg decided to launch a new reader.

Now changes are in store for another popular newsreading service, Pulse. The professional networking site LinkedIn on Thursday said it will buy the 3-year-old company for $90 million.

But before any of Pulse’s 30 million users begin searching for another reader, Pulse said its apps for iOS and Android will stay the same, and the company will continue to work on its existing products while developing new ones with LinkedIn.

In its Thursday announcement, the Pulse team said that it plans to help “professionals looking for insights to help make them better at what they do.” The first step is offering a LinkedIn influencer feed to push posts by entrepreneurs like Jack Welch and Richard Branson.

Another change: Pulse’s team will join LinkedIn’s employees at the company’s headquarters in Mountain View.

Purchase makes sense

The acquisition of Pulse makes sense for LinkedIn, which has worked to evolve beyond just a basic resume site. The network recommends connections and helps users find and apply for new gigs, with premium accounts for job-seekers. LinkedIn recently revamped its search features to help you network more effectively.

The company didn’t say exactly how it plans to integrate Pulse into its existing services, but LinkedIn’s Deep Nishar said in a statement that the company’s “vision for content is that LinkedIn will be the definitive professional publishing platform, and Pulse is a perfect complement to this vision.”

“We believe we can help all professionals make smarter and more informed business decisions leveraging all the great business knowledge flowing through LinkedIn in the form of news, Influencer posts, industry updates, discussions, comments, and more,” Nishar wrote in a Thursday blog post.

So your LinkedIn news feed, largely populated by articles your connections share, may soon become a source of more original content.

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