Cloning reaches new heights with 581 mice cloned from other clones

RIKEN
AAAAAAAH!!

Japanese biologists have officially smashed the record for sequential cloning (producing clones of clones) by creating 581 clones of a single mouse. The researchers say that they’ve created 25 generations of healthy and fertile cloned mice that all lived just as long as the original mouse.

This breakthrough could allow scientists to produce animal clones indefinitely. Some potential uses for the science could include creating cloning animal farms or unlimited copies of yourself.

Someone get Palpatine on the line.

The team at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan developed its cloned mice using the same somatic cell nuclear transfer technique that created the first cloned sheep, Dolly. The process, also sometimes known as "therapeutic cloning," was previously known to only produce a few generations of clones before the lifespans of the subject became significantly shorter or before too many genetic abnormalities surfaced to continue cloning the same animal.

The RIKEN team was able to produce more clone generations by introducing an enzyme blocker called trichostatin, a histone deacetylase inhibitor that resets the cloned cell nucleus back to an embryonic state. With this additional step, the scientists were able to produce embryos with fewer abnormalities in their DNA structure.

According to New Scientist, the team will next attempt to create more clones using cells extracted from mouse fur, stuffed bodies (which we think means taxidermy mice), and poop.

[RIKEN via Popular Science]

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