Security agency recommends disabling Java, due to exploit

Internet users should consider disabling Java in their browsers because of an exploit that can allow remote attackers to execute code on a vulnerable system, the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) recommended late Thursday.

Security researchers reported this week that cybercriminals were using a zero-day vulnerability in Java to attack computer systems. Attackers were using the vulnerability to stealthily install malware on the computers of users who visit compromised websites, researchers said.

The US-CERT security warning said the agency is "unaware of a practical solution to this problem."

Instead, US-CERT recommended Internet users disable Java in browsers. US-CERT is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

The problem can allow an untrusted Java applet to escalate its privileges, without requiring code signing. Oracle Java 7 update 10 and earlier are affected, US-CERT said.

"This vulnerability is being attacked in the wild, and is reported to be incorporated into exploit kits," US-CERT added. "Exploit code for this vulnerability is also publicly available."

Two spokeswomen for Oracle, the company that distributes Java, weren't immediately available for comment.

Sorin Mustaca, a security expert for security vendor Avira wrote a blog post Friday on how to deactivate Java in browsers.

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