Get your first look at the new Superman movie (and other things you missed)

Finally, after years of production and a tiny teaser in July, you can see the first full-length trailer for Superman: Man of Steel. While you contemplate all the possible plots of the upcoming summer 2013 movie, take a look at all the other stories you might have missed during the week.

Scientists make bread last for 60 days [BBC]

Bread still remains on the fastest spoiling food items on our shelves. No matter how many preservatives we inject into our loaves, mold always seems to develop within a week. Now, an American company called Microzap says it can use a high-power microwave to completely eliminate the spores that lead to mold. Supposedly, this technique allows the bread to stay fresh for two months without affecting the taste or quality. [via Business Insider]

NASA announces another Mars bound rover by 2020 [NASA]

Hot on the heels of the great success by Curiosity, NASA announced last week its intentions to land a next-generation rover on Mars in 2020. The as-yet unnamed NASA rover will be largely based on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) architecture that got a car-sized rover on the Red Planet in the first place. NASA is also holding an open competition to see what gets into the rover’s payload of scientific instruments. [via IEEE Spectrum ]

Brain pacemakers might one day be used to treat Alzheimer’s [Functional Neuromodulation]

Doctors already use deep-brain electrical stimulation to treat a number of neurological disorders including Parkinson’s, epilepsy, and severe obsessive-compulsive disorder. Last month, however, a team of surgeons from Johns Hopkins implanted one of these “brain-pacemakers” into the region of the brain involved in learning and memory as part of a six-patient Alzheimer’s trial.

The researchers hope the device can be used to stimulate parts of the brain to improve memory and slow cognitive decline in patients with the disease. The project is based off of another completed one-year trial in which six patients showed higher glucose consumption—which is normally stunted by the disease—in the memory and learning regions of their brains. The research is still too far off to call it a cure, but the scientists hope they’ve at least found a way to treat one of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s. [via Technology Review]

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