Call of Duty: Black Ops II to feature YouTube live game streaming

Gamers looking forward to the release of Call of Duty: Black Ops II on Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 have one more reason to get excited: YouTube live game streaming. As soon as the game launches November 13, gamers on the two major consoles will be able to live-stream their multiplayer League Play matches via YouTube. The new functionality, a first from Activision and game design studio Treyarch, will also let you include your webcam and audio commentary. To live stream your game you will need a YouTube account.

Call of Duty live streams will be available through a player's regular YouTube channel and accessible via any browser. Hardcore gamers can also view live streams via Call of Duty Elite, a free service for Black Ops II players that lets you track game stats, join clans, and view behind-the-scenes videos. The new functionality also uses the new League Play feature, an “e-sports” matchmaking system that sets online players against each other for competition based on roughly equivalent skill levels. To figure out your skill level, you have to play several test matches; you then get placed in a division based on how well you do. Each division will consist of hundreds of players.

The bad news for PC gamers, however, is that the live-streaming feature is only available for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. It appears Wii U users will also be left out when Black Ops II launches alongside Nintendo's new system in North America on November 18.

Call of Duty: Black Ops II created a lot of excitement when Activision and Treyarch previewed the game during E3 in June. The new first-person shooter features several storylines including a near-future plot set in 2025.

Shop ▾
arrow up Amazon Shop buttons are programmatically attached to all reviews, regardless of products' final review scores. Our parent company, IDG, receives advertisement revenue for shopping activity generated by the links. Because the buttons are attached programmatically, they should not be interpreted as editorial endorsements.

Subscribe to the Now Playing Newsletter

Comments