Naemura Group takes it back to the old school with paper computing

If you're wondering what paper documenting technology is, it's probably what you think it is, sort of. It's technology that lets you automatically erase, copy, and print hand-drawn sketches on paper. Using lasers. Why? We're not really sure, but the Naemura Group from the University of Tokyo is striving to make this a thing.

As spotted by Diginfo.TV, the Naemura Group's nascent system not only makes use of a camera and a computer but also a laser, a DMD-driven UV projector with a resolution of 1024 by 768 pixels, paper coated with a photochromic material, and a pen loaded with Frixion thermo-sensitive ink.

What makes the usage of Frixon pens so nifty is the fact that the ink apparently becomes transparent when heated, which it makes it possible for sketches to be erased when lit from behind by a laser. The erasure accuracy isn't too shabby either; it operates on intervals of 0.024mm.

But, really. Why paper computing? According to the explanation received by Diginfo.TV:

"The idea is to do computing on paper. But in the future, we'd like to enable several people to create one document, like with Google Docs, actually using real-world paper while far apart. We'd also like to enhance the rendering that's possible through collaboration between people and computers. For example, by giving more detailed access than you get by hand, and enabling you to draw large areas at once."

I'm torn. On paper, I suppose it's an excellent fusion of the old and the new but we do really need a reason to kill more trees? Leave your comments below.

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