Fujitsu to make waterproof Windows 8 tablet

Taking your tablet poolside might give you the willies. After all, it's okay if you get splashed, but can your tablet withstand a dunking as well? Computer maker Fujitsu may have a solution.

Fujitsu unveiled a Windows 8 version of its waterproof Arrows tablet at CEATEC, Japan's largest electronics show. The device is similar to an Android Honeycomb slate that Fujitsu debuted at the CES show in January.

Specs on the latest version of the waterproof tablet weren’t released by Fujitsu, but according to Engadget, the 10.1-inch slate had front- and rear-facing cameras, a micro USB port and microSD card slot. Unlike the model of the tablet exhibited at CES, the Windows 8 slate's posterior had a textured, metallic finish with sharp, rather than rounded, corners. The device also supports LTE.

The Android version of the Arrow tablet.

The Android version of Arrows, which hasn't been released yet, had a dual-core 1GHz Texas Instruments OMAP 4430 processor, 16GB of built-in storage and a WXGA touchscreen with a resolution of 1280-by-800 pixels.

According to experts, the tablet does operate underwater as advertised.

No firm availability or pricing information was available from Fujitsu, but it's believed that the Windows 8 Arrows tablet will be released in Japan in October or November. It's not likely to be sold outside Japan for some time after that.

The Pantech Element

Fujitsu isn't the only tablet maker producing waterproof slates. Earlier this year, AT&T started selling the Pantech Element for $300. The 8-inch tablet has a dual-core 1.5GHz Snapdragon processor, supports LTE, has an HDMI-out port, 1080p video playback, and two-megapixel front-facing camera and five-megapixel rear-facing snapper. According to Pantech, the unit can be submerged in up to one meter of water for as long as 30 minutes.

In addition, before year's end, new shockproof and waterproof tablets produced in Russia and running a stripped-down version of Android called RoMOS, for Russian Mobile Operating System, are expected to start appearing in the market for around $460.

RoMOS is the brainchild of the Russian defense ministry, which is concerned about the amount of data that Android collects from devices running it. Not only does the operating system not report your every move to Google, but its developers claim the OS is virtually hack proof. What’s more, the software uses Russia's alternative to GPS, GLONASS, which can come in handy should the US government decide to shut down GPS satellites to the public.

For comprehensive coverage of the Android ecosystem, visit Greenbot.com.

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