Sharp Joins 3D LCD TV Parade: Offers Four-Color Display

Sharp Joins 3D LCD TV Parade: Offers Four-Color Display
Sharp announced on Monday that it will be launching the world's first four-primary-color 3D LCD television set for availability later this year. The new television will require you to wear special glasses, as do most 3D sets being launched this year, and the company says its new LCD set will have a significantly brighter screen than its competitors. Sharp's 3D LCD will also feature Sharp's side-mount scanning LED backlight technology, which the company says reduces crosstalk--an effect in 3D sets that causes a ghost image to appear onscreen (even when wearing glasses) similar to a double exposure photograph.

Sharper Image

Sharp says its new television boasts brighter more vivid colors thanks to its four-color technology where the set uses red (R), green (G), blue (B) and yellow (Y) to produce color images as opposed to sets that use the standard RGB color display. The electronics maker also claims that its television will deliver a superior 3D image than its competitors thanks to several proprietary technologies Sharp has developed including the company's four-color display and side-mount scanning LED backlight technology. Sharp is set to reveal further technical details about its LCD set next month, according to Crunchgear.

Betting Big on 3D

The television industry is betting that 3D technology will be very popular this year among home users. Sharp is forecasting that 5 to 10 percent of its total television sales will come from 3D sets by March 2011, according to The Wall Street Journal. The year following, Sharp estimates that number will double to 20 or even 30 percent of the company's total television sales. Sony, one of Sharp's competitors, is similarly bullish about people bringing home 3D televisions this year. However, Sony and other manufacturers will have a slight lead time on Sharp. Sony's 3D sets are scheduled to be available worldwide this summer, and Panasonic 3D televisions are already available in the United States. Sharp, meanwhile, is only releasing its new 3D LCD set in Japan on an unspecified date this summer, and will then roll them out worldwide toward the end of the year.

Although 3D televisions are believed to be one of the biggest technology trends for 2010, the question remains whether people really want to bring a 3D-capable television into their home. As IDG News Service reported in January, there are some big obstacles to 3D TV adoption by home users including "the higher cost and complexity" of producing 3D content; the fact that you'll have to wear special glasses that may not be interchangeable with other 3D sets; and that millions of people have already invested in standard HDTVs. Despite those obstacles, however, most of the major television makers are betting that 3D televisions will be big this year including LG, Panasonic, Samsung, Sharp and Sony.

Are you planning on buying a 3D television this year, or are you waiting for 3D sets that don't need glasses? Or do you think the 3D TV trend is simply doomed to fail?

Connect with Ian on Twitter (@ianpaul).

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