CES 2010: New Canon PowerShots Are Low-Key, Low-Cost

LAS VEGAS -- While Canon aggressively revamped its Vixia camcorder line here at CES 2010, the company took a much more conservative approach to its camera lineup.

Canon unveiled four new A-series PowerShot point-and-shoot models, each of which will cost less than $200, and all of which will be available in February.

A handful of new scene modes and in-camera features will be available in Canon's entry-level models, including a low-light feature that boosts the ISO equivalency up to 3200, a "Super Vivid" scene mode that modifies an image's hue and saturation, and a "Smart FE" mode that Canon claims improves the quality of flash exposures.

The new PowerShots also have a YouTube mode that eases uploads to the video-sharing site, and the four new models are compatible with the mammoth-capacity SDXC cards.

The 12-megapixel Canon PowerShot A3100 IS (pictured below) offers optical image stabilization, a 4X-optical-zoom lens (35mm to 140mm), a 2.7-inch LCD, a rechargeable battery, and a $180 price tag. The new Canon PowerShot A3000 IS ($150) is identical to the A3100, but its resolution maxes out at 10 megapixels.

Canon PowerShot A3100 IS point-and-shoot camera

Also new to the 2010 lineup are the PowerShot A495 (pictured below) and PowerShot A490, both 10-megapixel cameras that run on AA batteries and lack optical image stabilization.

Canon PowerShot A495 point-and-shoot camera

The $130 A495 will feature all the new in-camera modes described above, while the A490 will offer only the ISO 3200, Smart FE, and YouTube modes.

For more up-to-the-minute blogs, stories, photos, and video from the nation's largest consumer electronics show, check out PC World's complete coverage of CES 2010.

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