Windows 7 Upgrade Struggle Continues

Windows 7 is now generally available and deals are everywhere, so you should start cranking on those upgrades or resear

ching which new PC to buy, right? Well, not so fast.

A week after the launch of Vista's replacement, much of the talk around Windows 7 has been about upgrade snags and too many reboots, and a money-saving installation workaround that Redmond let slide. There was also straight talk on Windows 7 security and some advice on the right time to upgrade. Strong hint: It's not now.

[ For complete coverage on Microsoft's new Windows 7 operating system -- including hands-on reviews, video tutorials and advice on enterprise rollouts -- see CIO.com's Windows 7 Bible. ]

There are also conflicting reports about enteprise plans for Windows 7, with some chomping at the bit to get off XP and others content to wait for Windows 7 to mature.

In other words, getting to Windows 7 is more complicated than it seems.

Here is this week's round up of Windows 7 upgrade stories from CIO.com and its sister publications.

Win 7 Upgrade Woes: Endless Reboots, Product Key Problems 10/26/2009Call it the legacy of Microsoft's Vista operating system. PC users upgrading from Windows Vista to Windows 7 have run into a variety of hair pulling problems since last Thursday when Windows 7 launched. Complaints range from endless reboots to refusals by Windows to accept Microsoft's assigned product keys.

Windows 7 Endless Reboot Answer Evades Microsoft 10/27/2009Some Windows users remained stymied today by endless reboots after trying to upgrade their PCs to Windows 7, according to messages posted on Microsoft's support forum.

Slideshow: Windows 7 in Pictures: The Coolest New Hardware

Slideshow: 7 Tools to Ease Your Windows 7 Rollout

Windows 7 Launch: Early Adopters Eager to Bid Farewell to XP 10/23/2009At the Windows 7 launch in New York, businesses planning to migrate to Windows 7 discussed cost savings, testing strategies, and security hopes and fears with CIO.com. One consensus: Windows XP is on life support.

Windows 7: IT Managers Will Be Slow to Move from XP 10/22/2009UK IT professionals are giving Windows 7 a guarded welcome, with concerns about quality, cost and compatibility tempering their enthusiasm for Microsofts new operating system.

Windows 7 Install Trick Saves Up to $100 10/23/2009Users can do a "clean" installation of Windows 7 using an upgrade license to save $80-$100 over the price of a "full" edition, a popular blog reported.

Microsoft Confirms Windows 7 Install Trick is Legal 10/29/2009Microsoft today confirmed that users can apply a workaround trick to do a clean install of Windows 7 on a blank hard drive as long as they toe the licensing line.

Users Should Delay Windows 7 Upgrade, Support Firm Warns 10/30/2009Users should wait for Microsoft to work out the bugs in Windows 7 before jumping on the new operating system, computer support firm Rescuecom said.

Five Things You Should Know About Windows 7 Security 10/29/2009Microsoft says Windows 7 is the most secure version of the Windows. What else would you expect? Is Microsoft going to come out with a new operating system and make it less secure than its predecessor? Still, there are actually a number of significant security improvements in windows 7 to be aware of.

Microsoft Unwraps Netbook Windows 7 Upgrade Tool 10/25/2009Microsoft has released a tool that lets netbook owners install Windows 7 on their machines using a USB flash drive, sidestepping the usual requirement of a DVD drive.

Microsoft Deal Discounts Windows 7 Upgrades By 58% 10/22/2009Microsoft today launched a promotion that discounts Windows 7 upgrades as much as 58% when customers also buy a new Windows 7 PC. Several retailers are already offering the deal to PC buyers.

Five Reasons to Upgrade to Windows 7 10/22/2009The curtain has been raised and the confetti has fallen. Windows 7 is here. After the problems with the launch of Windows Vista-- both real and perceived-- many users are cautious about jumping on Windows 7 too quickly.

Shane O'Neill is a senior writer at CIO.com. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/smoneill . Follow everything from CIO.com on Twitter at twitter.com/CIOonline .

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