How Will the T-Mobile/Orange Merger Affect US Customers?

Deutsche Telekom and France Télécom, owners of T-Mobile UK and Orange UK, respectively, plan to merge over the

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course of several months to create the largest wireless carrier in the U.K. T-Orange -- or whatever the entity will be called -- will have 28.4 million customers, or around 37 percent of U.K. mobile subscribers, outranking Vodafone UK, the current market leader, by 9.8 million customers. It will be a monster.

As part of the plan, both companies will be executing layoffs, reducing stores and staff as cost-cutting measures.

Will this merger affect the U.S. iteration of T-Mobile? It's too early to tell, but you can expect that as T-Mobile's influence washes over the U.K., some waves will hit American shores. With more money and customers overseas, T-Mobile may dig itself out from under Verizon and AT&T in the U.S. and develop a stronger base for future expansion. This could mean more exclusive handsets that put the iPhone to shame and aggressive pricing structures that make competitors seem grossly overpriced.

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Also, with boatloads of money, T-Mobile could absorb some of the smaller wireless carriers in the U.S., build a stronger signal, and attack its competitors with network innovations to improve reception and data-transfer speeds.

Alternately, T-Mobile could become lazy, at least in the U.K. The customers are there; why bother giving loyalists incentive for sticking around? This scenario seems far less likely and laziness is definitely not an attitude T-Mobile will bring to its U.S. operations.

I'm excited to see the little network that could build a stronger presence in the U.S. and give the big dogs a run for their money. Over time, expect T-Mobile to bust onto the U.S. scene with major changes (that preferably don't involve layoffs in this economy) and a renewed vigor.

For comprehensive coverage of the Android ecosystem, visit Greenbot.com.

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