IPhone 3G S Debuts Across U.S.

apple iphone 3gs launch
San Francisco buyers. Photo: Heather Kelly, Macworld
For the third consecutive summer, Apple released a new phone, and for the third consecutive summer, crowds flocked to buy it -- though perhaps not in as large a number as they had in the past.

This year's model, the iPhone 3G S, went on sale Friday morning in eight countries, including the U.S. And while people showed up at Apple and AT&T stores to get their hands on the latest iPhone, reports from around the country suggested that crowds were smaller than for previous launches, particularly when it came to queuing up overnight.

The lighter crowds are not all that surprising. Apple has sold 21 million iPhones through March 2009, and many customers who bought last year's iPhone 3G and remain under contract with AT&T are doubtlessly balking at paying the higher fee the wireless carrier is charging some users to upgrade.

Still, people turned out at stores across the country to pick up an iPhone 3G S. In Arlington, Va., the crowds returned to the Clarendon Apple Store for the new iPhone's launch. Fifteen minutes before the 7 a.m. opening, a line extended about halfway along the back of the considerable length of the mall.

Apple's Got a System

The process seemed a bit more organized than in past years, with the majority of people standing in line in Clarendon having pre-registered o

apple iphone 3gs
ver the Internet while non-registered customers stood off to the side to be gradually let in. (Indeed, posters to Macworld's forums have observed that lines for pre-orders were longer than the walk-up lines at multiple locations prior to the stores' openings.)

As the 7 a.m. launch rolled around, the doors of the Clarendon store opened on time, and a loud cheer went up from the front of the line. Apple employees allowed 18 pre-registered customers and one non-registered customer to enter the store to begin picking out their wares; a young female customer happily emerged from the store several minutes later with her new iPhone 3G S.

Pete Davenport of Falls Church, Va., showed up at 9:30 p.m. on Thursday when there were about half-a-dozen people in line. He waited until 3:30 a.m. when the number dwindled down to one person. He went home himself, caught 45 minutes of sleep and came back to find about 12 to 18 people in line or sitting on the curb. He then jumped to the front of the line and was found holding two iPhone 3Gs, which he bought just a few weeks ago and hopes to return for a free upgrade.

Standing next to Davenport, Louis Mattos also held a recently-bought iPhone 3G he was hoping to return. Mattos said that he was looking forward to the iPhone 3G S's faster processor, compass app, and turn-by-turn GPS functionality.

Toward the back of the line and sporting an older Motorola cell phone, Sherry Brothers confessed that this would be her first iPhone, but that she was looking forward to "pretty much everything about it." In particular, she was drawn by the iPhone's Internet and e-mail features. "It's also going to be better than my brother's, so I'm happy about that," she added.

Less than 15 minutes after the doors first opened, Sasa Eric, a lanky 25-year-old IT consultant emerged triumphantly, new iPhone 3G S box in hand. He described the process as relatively simple--he chose his phone, had an Apple Store employee activate it, paid for the unit, and was good to go.

A Few Glitches

Not every transaction went smoothly. One customer, Scott Struber said errors in the reservation system bumped him to the non-registered line even though he had brought his registration documents.

"It's a little glitch," Struber said. "I went online yesterday afternoon, made a reservation for the phone, it went through and completed it and sent me the e-mail saying that I was confirmed, but oddly never had me pick a store and showed Clarendon as the store I'd be working with. Apparently, their tool went down that let you pick a store, but that wasn't apparent to the users. I was probably sixth in line but I'll probably be 50th or 60th. But I'll still get it."

Hiccups aside, the Clarendon line appeared to be moving briskly enough with each customer taking a little less than 10 minutes between entering the store and leaving with an iPhone 3G S in hand. The activation woes that dogged the iPhone 3G launch last summer hadn't re-occurred on Friday morning. In fact, if you showed up early enough--at least at the Clarendon Apple Store--you could grab the new iPhone and a cup of coffee and get along to work on time. And that's how it should be.

Philip Michaels contributed to this report.

For comprehensive coverage of the Android ecosystem, visit Greenbot.com.

Subscribe to the Smartphone News Newsletter

Comments